Friday, May 29, 2020

Facing the Unknown


Facing the Unknown

Life has been so different these past few months as we have experienced the coronavirus become a global pandemic. So much has changed is such a short period of time. Little knowledge of this virus and its impact on our future has led to feelings of uncertainty. The crises of so much death, job losses, food shortages, and social isolation have left us struggling with how to handle the immense amount of emotion and stress that crisis and uncertainty bring. Even if we have not faced the death of someone we know or suffered the loss of our income, we have all been impacted by the change this crisis has brought about and face an unknown future in some way.

This week in our Living Your Word of the Year group we are exploring this very topic with a reflection question:
How are you engaging with your word in light of the unknown?
This question has given me an opportunity to look at my word of the year, fruit, and to look back over the past few months. Taking time for some reflection will be something we are going to focus on in our group over the next month. I have always found reflection and evaluation to be valuable practices in my life. My written journal and my art journal both are great tools to help me with the process of seeking God to examine my heart and life. As pastor and author Marc Alan Schelske said, 
"Journaling is an outward expression of your inward thought and heart life."
I use both of my journals for this purpose.

This week I began to look back through my journal for the past few months. On March 16, when we were beginning to face this crisis, I began to explore in my journal what life might look like in the weeks ahead. At that time our governor had closed schools for a month and had just declared bars and restaurants to be closed. Our church had also made the decision to stop in-person services for as long as the Governor deemed it appropriate. Since my job and much of my life revolve around ministry in the community I needed to determine how I would move forward. So I took some time to pray, to read Scripture, and then talk through what I felt was my call with my husband, and then with my pastor.

The first thing I did was to spend time finding out what was known about the virus at that time. How was it spread, what preventive measures could be taken, etc. Using that information to help guide my practice. I spent some time reading in 1 Peter, a letter written to Christ followers on how to live during times of crisis and suffering. I read many other passages in Scripture as well, and I spent a lot of time praying. This is what I determined back in March:


I've tried to use these as my guidelines for the past few month. I am volunteering in the community, trying to help make sure kids and families are fed. I'm trying not to engage in the divisiveness that has sadly become a part of this pandemic. I am mainly working from home, but am fully following the safe guidelines we have been provided with when I go out a couple of times a week. I've lessened the amount of news I take it. Not because I agree or disagree with the broadcasts, but because I am so emotional over the loss of life and over the divisiveness in our nation at a time when we should be caring for and supporting each other. In the early phases of staying at home I spent too much time reading news stories and social media and had times of totally checking out by binge watching TV. I got off track with eating well and exercising for the first month or so, but have turned that ship around. And then I remembered my training. That is what discipleship is all about after all, training to be like Jesus. Building our faith through spiritual practices so that we can draw from that deep well in times of crisis. So, I got back to what I know: Begin my days in God's Word before anything else. So when I look back through my journals for  the past months I find this:
The fruit of years of walking with the Lord and learning to trust Him; the years of spending time reading and studying His Word and learning how to live a life of faith, have borne fruit I didn't know I would need for such a time as this. I found that, while I was concerned about the virus and loss of life and about my family, I also had a peace about my role right now. 
What has not been on my mind: fear and anxiety. That is not to say there have not been times of riding emotional roller coasters, but I have found that the many years of being in God's Word and trusting Him through some difficult trials in the past have produced trust and faith in who God is, and in His goodness and faithfulness.. He is on control, even when the world feels out of control. I don't want to appear as if I have the answers to what is going on or to know exactly how we should handle life right now. It's going to look different for each of us because we each face different situations in this crisis. My time of reflection has just pleasantly surprised me with seeing the fruit of walking with the Lord and pursuing Him wholeheartedly in the practice of spiritual disciplines.

Last year I trained myself to memorize some Scripture passages, something I had always struggled with in the past. The two passages I memorized and meditated over repeatedly through the past year were Philippians 4:4-7 and Colossians 3:1-3. They both come mind so often these days and I've learned the value of having Scripture "hidden in my heart". Those passages have helped me stay anchored, grounded in my faith in God. More unexpected fruit that has blossomed in a time of need.






So, how are you engaging with your word of the year in light of the unknown? May I encourage you to take time in the weeks ahead and reflect on how life has been for you over the past few months. We'll provide questions and Scripture passages to help guide us in prayer and in reflection and evaluation.

Join us in the Living Your Word Community
My friends Bernice Hopper, and Valerie Sjodin, and I share insights through blog posts for creatively living a word of the year. In our Facebook group, we encourage one another by posting questions and prompts to inspire living out a word focus, keeping a journal etc. It is a safe place to ask for prayer and support. If you would like to connect with others in creative ways about living your word, you can ask to join our Living Your Word of the Year 2020 by clicking on the link below.

Hashtag for Instagram:  #livingyourword2020
Check out their blogs:

Friday, April 24, 2020

The Fruit of Self-Care


The Fruit of Self-Care


In our Living Your Word of the Year group we have been pondering weekly questions to help us connect with our word of the year in order to make it an active part of our lives. This week our question is:
How can you nurture your word with self-care this week?
We can thank Valerie Sjodin for these great weekly questions.  :)

My word for 2020 is fruit. The quote that describes my intention for selecting this word is by Dallas Willard:
"If you tend to the tree, the fruit will take care of itself."
For me, a large part of "tending to the tree" is about self-care practices. Fruit is the by-product of something else. Spiritually, it is the by-product of the Holy Spirit's work in our lives. He enables us to position ourselves before the Father for transformation. Spiritual practices or disciplines help us in this positioning, they help us live the life of the Spirit.


Self-care can be a loaded term in some circles. Some may see it as selfish or being self-indulgent. Others may have the view that it is a time waster, something only those who have a lot of extra time on their hands can indulge in. Whatever your view of self-care may be, I hope you'll indulge me in sharing my thoughts on the subject. 

In my own journey, embracing self-care came out of a time in my life when I was experiencing burn-out. I had worked in ministry for quite a few years - the same ministry I work in now - and I was struggling with feeling worn out, having no energy, constantly emotional, and not seeing how I could continue to pour out myself in outreach ministry for much longer. I was running on empty and it felt like the only solution to my problem was to quit my job. I am not going to go too much into the details here, but I ended up not quitting my job, and over the course of a few years of reading, studying the Bible, and talking with a few trusted friends, I found the answer to my burn-out issues was in self-care.

One of my foundational passages of Scripture for self-care is Mark 12:28-31.
"One of the teachers of the law came and heard them debating. Noticing that Jesus had given them a good answer, he asked him, “Of all the commandments, which is the most important?”“The most important one,” answered Jesus, “is this: ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.” "
Jesus says that loving God and loving our neighbor/others are the most important commandments. Yet this verse also makes an assumption: that you are already loving yourself. Not loving yourself in an unhealthy manner that is self-absorbent or verges on narcissism, but in a manner that is healthy and good, and that out of that place you will love your neighbor/others in the same manner. To me loving yourself is about self-care. It's about taking care of yourself in ways that keep you healthy emotionally, physically, mentally, and spiritually so that you can be your best for others. Jesus modeled this when he withdrew and sought solitude, rest and time for prayer. He even did this at the expense of not serving others needs at times. He taught it and modeled it to His disciples. He was so in tune with His Father and the Father's will that he was able to discern when it was time for self-care and when it was time for caring for others. 



Over the past years I have used this verse as a guideline when determining my intentions or goals with my word for the year. Jesus is calling us to love God with our whole being:
  • With all our heart - this is our emotional health. Often burn-out has more to do with a loss of emotional energy than physical. So what habits and activities help restore my emotional energy? How can I make time for these activities in order to fill up what has been drained?
  • With all our soul - this is our spiritual health. How am I regularly drawing closer to God? What practices can I put into place that deepen my relationship with Him and that help create spiritual health?
  • With all my mind - this is our mental health. What am I doing to keep my brain healthy? How can I keep learning and growing? What practices need to be in place?
  • With all my strength - this is our physical health. Being physically healthy helps all of the other areas of our health. What practices do I need to put into place to eat well, to exercise, to insure good sleep? What practices do I need to eliminate that cause my body to be unhealthy?
The other passage for self-care that is important to me offers Jesus' prescription:
“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” Matthew 11:28-30

Self-care is about resting in Jesus and learning from Him. But that's a message for another day!

This week think about your intentions and goals for your word of the year and ponder this:
What am I doing to care for my heart? For my soul? For my mind? For my strength? What am I doing to grow healthier in these areas, so that I may love God with my whole being and love my neighbor/others well? 
(Complete with a pen slip-up!)



"When I stop and rest, I can fill up and that enables me to pour out." ~Sunshyne Gray

Join us in the Living Your Word Community
My friends Bernice Hopper, and Valerie Sjodin, and I share insights through blog posts for creatively living a word of the year. In our Facebook group, we encourage one another by posting questions and prompts to inspire living out a word focus, keeping a journal etc. It is a safe place to ask for prayer and support. If you would like to connect with others in creative ways about living your word, you can ask to join our Living Your Word of the Year 2020 by clicking on the link below.

Hashtag for Instagram:  #livingyourword2020
Check out their blogs:

Saturday, April 11, 2020

Pilgrimage 3


Pilgrimage 3

Pilgrimage part 1 is here and part 2 here.

Almost a month ago the last gathering I attended before Coronavirus stopped our world was our church service. The day before that I spoke at our women's ministry brunch. I was asked to speak to the women about what outreach is from a biblical and a practical perspective. And what I shared there seems to connect with the pilgrimage theme I've shared over my past two blog posts as I have shared the journal I made last summer.

How might the theme of outreach connect with the theme of pilgrimage, you may be thinking. First, let's remember what the definition of pilgrimage is. A pilgrimage is a journey to a sacred place; a spiritual journey; a holy expedition. It is often used as a metaphor for viewing our life in Christ as a spiritual journey, a journey of transformation. Our spiritual journey is to follow the ways of Christ.


In the New Testament we are reminded that "our citizenship is in heaven, And we eagerly await a Savior from there, the Lord Jesus Christ" (Philippians 3:20). So throughout the New Testament we are reminded that we are strangers, foreigners in this world, exiles. We are on a journey through this life, pilgrims on their way home. 


And so, I ended my last post this way: Living life as a pilgrim calls us to view all of our life as one who is on mission, on a journey, making us all missionaries, whether we travel abroad or stay in our home towns. It's a way of seeing this life through the eyes of an exile in a foreign land. Author Elliot Clark, in his book Evangelism as Exiles, puts it this way:

"In my experience, many missionaries - even volunteers on short-term ministry trips - tend to consciously approach every moment in relation to mission. They saturate their days in prayer. They consider the intended or unintended consequences of their mannerisms and behavior, being careful how they spend their money, how they dress, and how they interact with others. They demonstrate the utmost respect and honor for locals, even to people drastically different from them. They also view random encounters as God-ordained opportunities, so they purposefully speak with just about anyone about their faith."

God had a specific call on how His people were to live while in exile. Speaking to the Israelites in exile in Babylon, God spoke to them through the prophet Jeremiah:
 "This is what the Lord Almighty. the God of Israel, says to all those carried into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon: Build houses and settle down; plant gardens and eat what they produce. Marry and have sons and daughters; find wives for your sons and give your daughters in marriage, so that they too may have sons ad daughters. Increase n number there; do not decrease. Also, seek the peace and prosperity of the city to which I have carried you into exile. Pray to the Lord for it, because if it prospers, you too will prosper." Jeremiah 29:4-7
 While in exile they are to do the things that create a life: make homes, produce food, marry, bear children, etc. But they are also called to seek the peace and prosperity (both words in Hebrew are shalom) of the city in which they live. They are to pray for it, for it to prosper (again shalom), and if the city prospers, then they will also prosper (shalom). 

So then, how are we as Christ-followers to live while we are in exile -while we are pilgrims in this world? We can use God's words to the Israelites as an example along with the words and life of Christ. We can follow in His ways and love our neighbors. On our pilgrimage we imitate the life and character of Christ. This is what growing in Christ's likeness is all about. Outreach is simply about reaching out to others, imitating Christ's incarnation. How do we imitate Jesus' life?

We go, we serve, we love. 

This was my message at the women's brunch:


We go because that is what Jesus did and that is what He called us to do. The incarnation is about Jesus coming into the world in human form. In John 6:38 Jesus tells us “I came down from heaven.”  He willingly left heaven and came to earth. The Word became flesh and made His dwelling among us. (John 1:14) He left his rightful place beside the Father, with its comforts and privileges, and He came to earth, becoming a human, taking on the nature of a servant. We see this in Philippians 2:6-7 as well as other places throughout the New Testament. Why did He leave heaven and become a human? To reveal God to us. To show us in the flesh what God is like. And to bring redemption and salvation to the world. And He calls us to go and reveal God and show the world what God is like, revealing redemption and salvation through Him. Jesus’ great commission to His people begins with the word “Go”. As the Father sent the Son into the world, He then sends His followers into the world to continue His mission. We go, because Jesus did.






We then serve, because Jesus served. Jesus says in Mark 10:45, “Even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” Jesus was called to serve and His life shows many examples of this. He met people’s needs both physical and spiritual, all with the purpose of bringing glory to the Father. He served because it was the Father’s will. He served obediently, humbly, and sacrificially. And He calls us to the same kind of service.  Philippians 2:5 says we are to have the same attitude as Christ, then the rest of the passage shows us his humility, his obedience and servanthood. Earlier in the same passage Paul calls us to “consider others as better than ourselves” and to “look to others interests” as well as our own. These are Christ’s sacrificial, servant-like characteristics that we are called to imitate.





Finally, we love, because Jesus loved. Paul tells us in Ephesians 5 “Be imitators of god, therefore as dearly loved children, and live a life of love just as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us as a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.” John continues Paul’s message in 1 John 4, “This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him. This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. No one has ever seen God; but if we love one another, God lives in us and his love is made complete in us.”
Love is sacrificial. Love is practical and active. Throughout the Bible we see God described as loving and compassionate, and then he acts toward His people according to this nature. Throughout the gospels it is recorded that Jesus had compassion on people, and that this compassion would move him to act -  healing, feeding, serving, meeting people’s needs. (See for example Matthew 9:36, 14:14, 15:32, 20:34)
Who are we called to love? Again we imitate Jesus. The scope of who we are called to love ranges from the world, who God so loved that he gave his son, to one another in the God’s family, our neighbors, and even our enemies. There are no exceptions to our call to love.




Imitating Jesus in reaching out to the world around us seems intimidating. But it is a call that we are given together, we have each other. And where God guides, He provides. We are a people of faith. We have to believe that when we faithfully care for what and who He calls us to, that He will then meet our needs. Just like with tithing, we serve trusting that He will take care of our needs. Returning to Mark 10:45 where Jesus tells us that He came to serve. This is not simply a call for us to imitate Him in serving, it is also a promise that He will serve us as well. God empowers us with His Spirit to do His will and to act according to His good purpose (Philippians 2:13).

Thank you for joining me as I have explored the theme of Pilgrimage.

Saturday, March 21, 2020

Pilgrimage 2


Pilgrimage 2

As I mentioned in my last post, I spent time this past summer studying the theme of pilgrimage in order to make some art for a magazine that Kris Camealy was compiling to coincide with a retreat she had planned for March of this year. Unfortunately the retreat has been cancelled, like so much of life in these days of the coronavirus pandemic. 

As promised in that previous post, today I'm going to share some of what I studied on the topic of pilgrimage, as well as more photos from the journal I made to accompany this study.

By definition, a pilgrimage is a journey to a sacred place; a spiritual journey; a holy expedition. Often when we think of this word we think of long ago times when people would travel to go to a religious place for observance of a holy holiday. We see the start of this tradition in the Old Testament, where God spoke of his covenant with his people. Part of that covenant was to include pilgrimage:
"Three times a year all your men are to appear before the Sovereign Lord, the God of Israel." Exodus 34:23
We then see throughout the Old Testament stories and Psalms reference to the annual pilgrimages made to the temple, to Jerusalem. But there is a different use of the term pilgrimage that uses it as a metaphor for viewing our life in Christ as a spiritual journey; a journey of transformation.


A journey implies that a leaving takes place and that we travel with a destination in mind. We see this type of language as we read God's Word, where Christ-followers are on a journey of leaving their former way of life, of living a new life, of traveling on a journey with the destination being that of becoming Christ-like, and with our eyes on our true home. And so we read Bible verses and passages that use terms such as path, road, way:

"You have made know to me the path of life." Psalm 16:11

:...Lead me in the way everlasting." Psalm 139:24

"And a highway will be there; it will be called the way of holiness...it will be for those who walk in that way." Isaiah 35:8


"But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to Life, and only a few find it." Matthew 7:14

"Blessed are those whose strength is in You, who have set their hearts on pilgrimage." Psalm 84:5
\
"Jesus said, 'I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." John 14:6

In fact, in the book of Acts we see many references to early Christians being called "The Way" since they followed the way of Jesus and shared with others the way to be saved. (Acts 9:2; 16:17; 18:25-26; 19:9,23; 22:4; 24:14,22)

With the call throughout the New Testament to keep our eyes on our true home, Christians are often reminded that in this world we are aliens and strangers - pilgrims - who, while we make this place our home, we are merely passing through on the way to our eternal home. And while we have our final destination in view, our focus is on the journey, the process of becoming more and more like the One who redeemed us and called us to this new life.









Living life as a pilgrim calls us to view all of our life as one who is on mission, on a journey, making us all missionaries, whether we travel abroad or stay in our home towns. It's a way of seeing this life through the eyes of an exile in a foreign land. Author Elliot Clark, in his book Evangelism as Exiles, puts it this way:

"In my experience, many missionaries - even volunteers on short-term ministry trips - tend to consciously approach every moment in relation to mission. They saturate their days in prayer. They consider the intended or unintended consequences of their mannerisms and behavior, being careful how they spend their money, how they dress, and how they interact with others. They demonstrate the utmost respect and honor for locals, even to people drastically different from them. They also view random encounters as God-ordained opportunities, so they purposefully speak with just about anyone about their faith."

But then, this thought now leads me away from the focus of my journal and into a focus on  missional living and outreach.  I spoke on that topic last weekend at our Women's Ministry brunch, but I'll save that for another post, maybe "Pilgrimage 3" if there's an interest. Let me know in the comments. :)

So, this study and journaling was all done back in the summer, but in our current times it feels even more appropriate to remember who we are. And also to remember "whose" we are. In times that feel uncertain and even scary, it's good to remember that this world is not our true home. While we journey through this life, we who are Christ-followers are called to a particular way of life and way to live. In the midst of social-distancing and self-isolation, of no church services, of schools and businesses closing, of job losses and economic crisis, I feel the call even more deeply to be on the journey Jesus has called us to. I feel called, now more than ever, to serve those in need and to care for one another, while at the same time practicing wisdom and taking precautions. We need to find ways to care for those who will struggle with food crises during this time. To take care of the needs of the elderly and those who are immune compromised. To minister to the needs of those who are sick and quarantined. I'm finding ways for those in my church to minister in these times and I encourage you to do the same.

I'll leave you with the last few pages of the quotes I found on pilgrimage:




Sunday, March 15, 2020

Pilgrimage

A few years ago I attend a retreat called Refine Retreat with my friend Bernice when she was visiting from England. The retreat was hosted by Kris Camealy. I first connected with Kris way back in 2011 when I joined her pre-launch team for her book "Come, Lord Jesus" and then used her book for my Advent art prompts that year. This past summer, in advance of her annual Refine Retreat, Kris asked former retreat attendees to submit art or writing for the 2020 retreat theme of pilgrimage to be used in her Refine magazine.

It's a great topic, so I decided to spend time last summer studying what God's Word says about pilgrims and pilgrimage. I then made a journal to create art from my study and reading. Kris chose one of the my pages to use in her retreat magazine. It's a great magazine with lots of art and articles from a variety of creatives. 




You can get the Refine Journal here:


I made a concertina book (also known as an accordion journal) to hold my pilgrimage art. It included a little booklet of lined paper on the back inside cover to hold my notes.




The piece that was included in the magazine was taken from this page of my journal.




In my next post I'll dig into what I learned and share more views of my journal.

Unfortunately, with all that is going on in our world with Corona virus, Kris has had to cancel her retreat, which was to be held next weekend.

Around here, we are preparing for 3-4 weeks of social distancing to prevent the spread of Corona Virus which entered our state on Monday. Schools are closed for at least the next three weeks. We are holding our church service this morning, but then will not have a public gathering for worship until Good Friday. At least that's our plan. We'll wait and see how well social distancing keeps the virus from spreading too rapidly. I have not had much time for art in the past few weeks, so I guess this forced slow down could have some advantages in that arena. 

I hope and pray that  all of you who follow my blog are doing well, and that you and your families are safe and healthy. Blessings to all of you on this Sunday morning. :)

A great read for Advent or any time:


Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Ash Wednesday ~ Remember


Ash Wednesday ~ Remember

Today we begin the season of Lent by observing Ash Wednesday. We remember that we are sinful people. The ashes that will be placed on the foreheads of those who attend worship services today are a biblical symbol of mourning, repentance, and remembering our brokenness and need for God's grace. They are "an outward sign of our inner repentance before God" (Aaron Damiani, pastor and author). Lent is the journey that prepares us for the Good News of Easter - our forgiveness and redemption in Jesus Christ.


A large part of Lent is about remembrance. Remembrance ushers us into examination and reflection as we remember who we are and what we are called to, as we remember our weaknesses and failings, as we remember God's grace to us through His Son, and His love for us in redeeming us from the bondage of sin. Over the past few years, in the seasons of Advent and Lent, I have engaged in a practice of reflecting on daily words and Scripture passages and then responding to them creatively in an art journal. It aides in my practice of remembrance and reflection, taking the Scripture passages deeper into my mind and heart as I add a creative, tactile experience.




I am posting a list of Lent Words with Scripture passages revised from previous years lists. The words and Scripture passages can help us remember who we are. If you are interested, use them as art or writing prompts through the season of Lent. I will post periodic devotions throughout the season as time allows. As we are currently traveling on vacation, the images in today's post are mine from previous years. If you choose to participate in Lent Words this year please share on social media using #lentwords2020.

Click for a downloadable pdf
You can also join us in the Words Challenge Facebook group to share art and conversation. Join here.
If you would like to read devotions from my previous Lent Words you can find them here or click on the Words Challenge tab above.






Sunday, February 23, 2020

Lent Words 2020


Lent 2020

A few years ago I rose to the challenge to put together a Lent Words challenge after the great feedback I received from my first Advent Words challenge in 2017. I learned a few things during that first Lent Words. First, 40 days is a long time for a challenge, especially one that includes devotions and art. So that year I got some help from some friends who did some guest posts and I did not do a devotion every day of the challenge. It was still a lot to keep up with and this is generally a pretty busy season for me. So last year, 2019, I created another words list for Lent and then did a few devotional posts through the season. This year I am posting a copy of the words list from last year. I left it undated to make it easier to use in the future. Once again this year I will just post devotions periodically throughout the season.


Click for a downloadable pdf

If you are interested in the words list from Lent 2018 and the devotions from that year you can find them here or click on the Words Challenge tab above. If you make art during the Lent season share it using #Lentwords2020. You can also share it in the Words Challenge Facebook group. Join here.


Friday, February 14, 2020

Playing With Lettering My Word


Playing With Lettering My Word

One way I explore my word of the year is by reading books that will help me live out my intentions for my word. At the end of last year as I was exploring my choice for my 2020 word, fruit, I ran across an article that quoted Dallas Willard. As I looked up the Dallas Willard quote in one of his books, I realized that he had a lot to say about the areas I'm trying to further explore and grow in. So I decided that I would re-read, or finish reading, a few of his books this year. So, for me, this is the year of Dallas Willard! I am starting with his book "Renovation of the Heart", which is all about how we grow spiritually and what spiritual transformation looks like. I highly recommend it!


One way to keep what I'm reading in my mind is to slow down and write quotes from the books in both my writing journal and in my art journal. I used a few quotes to play with some of my lettering styles this past week in preparation for this week's challenge in our Living Your Word group, which is to letter your word and to think of a color that reflects your word.


Cutting letters out of painted papers is one of my favorite ways to make words. Green seems to be the color I am gravitating to for my word this year, as green is a color that symbolizes growth. On my page spread I used painted paper cut letters and then I lettered my quotes with my hand lettering and filled it with color.




Since I was thinking about my lettering styles, I played around throughout the week writing one of my theme verses for the year in a variety of the lettering styles I use. It was a great way to play this week!


Pop over to our Living Your Word Facebook group and join us in exploring ways to live out your word of the year. There has been a lot of great conversations and examples form group members of how they are living out their word. Valerie Sjodin has also written a blog post today about lettering your word of the year. Read it here.

Living Your Word 2020 Opportunity!
My friends Bernice Hopper, and Valerie Sjodin, and I share insights through blog posts for creatively living a word of the year. In our Facebook group, we encourage one another by posting questions and prompts to inspire living out a word focus, keeping a journal etc. It is a safe place to ask for prayer and support. If you would like to connect with others in creative ways about living your word, you can ask to join our Living Your Word of the Year 2020 by clicking on the link below.

Hashtag for Instagram:  #livingyourword2020

Check out their blogs: